The Cove

August 6, 2009

Louis Psihoyos and I were photographer’s together at Fortune Magazine and also National Geographic Magazine. He’d gone quiet for a time but now I see what he’s been up to: The Cove.I call it a brilliant documentary; a friend called it an advocacy movie with a sense of humor. Make a difference and go see it. The trailer here is brilliant too.

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Look3The third Look3 a festival of the photograph founded by National Geographic photographer Nick Nichols and Jessica Nagle comes at an interesting time for photography. With newspapers and magazines losing subscriptions and every photographer I met telling tales of diminishing assignments and struggling for survival, it seems like a great chance to explore where photography can go next.

So I was particularly excited to see the Shots show at the open air pavilion at the end of the pedestrian mall in charming Charlottesville, VA where the festival is held. This was all about multimedia, and trumpeted as “work from emerging and internationally recognized photographers.”

and there was some mighty fine work and presentations, including:

Michael Wolf’s Transparent City,
Christian Ziegler’s Art of Deception,
Saiful Huq Omi’s Bangladesh,
Alejandro Chaskielberg’s High Tide,
Andrew Cutraro’s Out Yonder
and the merciful relief of Alex Prager’s Big Valley.

But at the end of 2 hours, I came away overwhelmed from that distinctly American desire to confuse giving people too much crap the better option over smaller more thoughtful bites of quality.

So for a festival of three’s, I offer my gallery of too’s:

  • too much volume. YEAH!! DISTORTEDAUDIO!!! YEAHHHHH!!!!!
  • too many pictures. Thank god for the 4 minute limit
  • too much self importance, visually and in narration, without showing me why
  • too many things I’ve seen before in terms of style and approach
  • too few surprises
  • too many wide angle pictures following by more wide angle pictures
  • too little desire to communicate understanding.

One big surprise was the amount of stolen popular music. It’s astounding that photographers, an artistic community that values ownership and rights to creative work would baldly rip off other artists, often without credit and most probably without permission. A colleague suggested we should have a music festival where all of these images were shown onstage without permission and without credit or payment. Any objections?

But if you’re going to steal, be bold so my vote for the best use of stolen music goes to Michael Rubenstein for his witty use of Marvin Gaye’s “Let’s Get it On’ with his photos of Mumbai Sperm Banks. For a moment we got to laugh .

deconstruction

March 3, 2009

People often ask me to come speak about my work. These days I love talking about multimedia because it’s my current passion. So when the American Society of Picture Professionals asked me to stop by on Tuesday, March 10 at 6.30, I thought it’d be fun to look at a single piece from start to finish. Hope you can make it.



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Happy Holidays

December 24, 2008

Happy Holidays.

Happy Holidays from Bob and Regina

power of time

December 31, 2007

My friend and OU grad school classmate Tim Gruber has an interesting and opinionated blog.

As part of an exercise in our video class, we had to post our favorite movie. He chose this film from YouTube, which asks: If you had the power to turn back time, would it be a good thing?

See ya all in the New Year!!!

Friends

August 10, 2007

Gianluca and Sophie in Pienza

One fun thing about my trip to Italy was the contrast. In Sant Anna in Camprena where I was staying, there was no internet access and cell phones only worked in a far off corner of the property. So Gianluca and Sophie and I went to nearby Pienza where an entrepreneur has set up a satellite internet point. The cool part is that after you buy your online time, you can go outside and sit on the medieval walls of a building with your laptop and use the “weefee”. After the three of us finished catching up with the virtual world, we engaged in that old fashion form of communication: a conversation.